Culture, Meaning, and The Metaphysics of Ancient Memory

Ancient peoples regarded memory as divine or supernatural.  Memory is thoroughly bound up in Antiquity with the Cult of the Dead, whose constituency cries out for commemoration.  In ten-thousand-year-old Çatal Hüyük in Central Anatolia the dwellers lived in apartments built over the sepulchers of their ancestors.  The past – in the form of the dead […]

Will Europe Follow Atlantis? Part III: The Modern West

Lewis Spence and the revolt against the modern world

Spence himself invokes William Blake, in Will Europe Follow Atlantis, by references to the Lambeth seer’s America a Prophecy (1793) and Europe a Prophecy (1794).  Spence understands Blake in the context of Bardic Poetry and the Grail Saga, describing him as “of the lineage of the Sons of the Grail” and as enjoying “the birthright […]

Will Europe Follow Atlantis? Part II: Lewis Spence and The Occult War

Of all the interpreters of the Atlantis Myth since Plato, Lewis Spence (1874 – 1955), founder of the Scottish National Movement and folklorist-mythographer extraordinaire, most closely grasped the story’s cosmological-moral theme.  Although critics tend to treat Spence’s many books on Atlantis as falling into the archeological-literalist camp, their tenor, even in the earliest of them, […]

Will Europe Follow Atlantis? Part I: True Myth

The true myth of Atlantis

The phrases “true myth” and “probable myth” – in Greek, alethinos muthos and eikos muthos – come from Plato’s dialogues. They designate a rhetorical gesture in the dialogues that has to do, on the one hand, with the limits of definition and syllogism, and on the other with the validity of image and symbol. From […]

Europe, Terror, and the Higher Man

Feeling solidarity with the victims of the Paris attacks — and with the culture that has given us everything from Baudelaire to Monet — in the aftermath a large number of people changed their Facebook profile photo to one with the French flag superimposed on it. It was a small gesture by a lot of […]

Indo-Europe Rising: A Book Review

Russian philosopher Azsacra Zarathustra with eagle.

Containing 69 theses, Indo-Europe Rising by Azsacra Zarathustra (43 pages; published by Cyberwit, India) is a manifesto that lays the groundwork for a revolution of spirit and action in Asia and Europe. However, the work does not present rational arguments about certain political or social points in an appeal to the ordinary man or woman. Rather, it is a […]

Sacrifices, priestesses, and the roots of modern sport

“What is remarkable about [ancient] Greek sport,” says David Sansone in Greek Athletics and the Genesis of Sport, “is the seriousness with which it was taken as a  cultural and even religious phenomenon.” “Sport is, no less than burnt offerings and libations, a form of ritual sacrifice.” Though spotlighted almost exclusively in entertainment — and rarely […]