Reality Is Overrated; Why Subjectivity Informs Our Experience Of The World

In An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, John Locke focuses on epistemology. The theory of knowledge. His most important aim was to know what reality was really like. Like many other scientists and philosophers of his time (Montaigne, Galileo) Locke became fascinated with the difference between ‘reality’ and the way we experience, or perceive reality. He […]

Are Friends Electric?: Machines, Emotions, And The Importance of Rule Breaking

A robot is a machine. One definition of a machine, used by people like Alan Turing who invented the concept of a modern computer, is a rule-following device. A computer, and by extension, a robot satisfies this definition. Computers are rule-following devices. They do what we program them to do; no more, no less. Clearly, […]

After Death, And Beyond The Rational: Man, Divinity, And Reincarnation

Fallen angel statue

Assumptions are inevitable and unavoidable. One assumes that other drivers are not going to run stop signs and red lights. One assumes that the floor one was standing on yesterday will not give way today. The food that sustained us yesterday will not poison us today. We make innumerable assumptions on faith without evidence, or […]

Nazi Girls Are Easy: Porn, Cinema, And The Body In Anti-Racist Politics

Porn has a political message. At least at times. Partly because the center-Right claims to stand for “family values,” and to oppose sex out of wedlock and other “sins” (including, often, pornography), political propaganda of the pornographic type has tended to emanate from the Left-wing. More than just an open rejection of the center-Right’s values, certain theories on […]

From Romanticism to Traditionalism

The movement called Romanticism belongs chronologically to the last two decades of the Eighteenth and the first five decades of the Nineteenth Centuries although it has antecedents going back to the late-medieval period and sequels that bring it, or its influence, right down to the present day.  Historically, and in simple, Romanticism is the view-of-things […]

Damage Done: Philosophy, Medicine, And The Preventable Harm We Do

Medicine by Gustav Klimt

Between 1900 and 1907 Gustav Klimt painted the ceiling of the University of Vienna’s Great Hall. A triptych: one of the paintings was titled “Medicine.” However, in contrast to the popular contemporary image of the science – as one that has helped us to live longer and healthier lives – Klimt’s painting places the skeletal […]

Nietzsche: Allure and Misunderstanding on the Left and Right

Friedrich Nietzsche says many true things and many outlandishly immoral things. There’s clearly a religious and philosophical earnestness underlying many of the things he says, despite a superficial jokey cynicism. Reading Nietzsche inevitably raises the question – what is this person up to? He’s clearly up to something, but what? He attacks slave morality, but master […]

Adversity, and its Importance

Ferdinand Hodler, The Day (detail).

Friederich Nietzsche tells us that “whatever does not kill us makes us stronger.” It’s a bold statement. Yet, though today the culture often seems to reward those who wallow in self-pity (not least of all through litigation for emotional upsets and “offense”), adversity has played a crucial part in the spiritual, intellectual, and creative development […]