From Romanticism to Traditionalism

The movement called Romanticism belongs chronologically to the last two decades of the Eighteenth and the first five decades of the Nineteenth Centuries although it has antecedents going back to the late-medieval period and sequels that bring it, or its influence, right down to the present day.  Historically, and in simple, Romanticism is the view-of-things […]

Damage Done: Philosophy, Medicine, And The Preventable Harm We Do

Medicine by Gustav Klimt

Between 1900 and 1907 Gustav Klimt painted the ceiling of the University of Vienna’s Great Hall. A triptych: one of the paintings was titled “Medicine.” However, in contrast to the popular contemporary image of the science – as one that has helped us to live longer and healthier lives – Klimt’s painting places the skeletal […]

Nietzsche: Allure and Misunderstanding on the Left and Right

Friedrich Nietzsche says many true things and many outlandishly immoral things. There’s clearly a religious and philosophical earnestness underlying many of the things he says, despite a superficial jokey cynicism. Reading Nietzsche inevitably raises the question – what is this person up to? He’s clearly up to something, but what? He attacks slave morality, but master […]

Adversity, and its Importance

Ferdinand Hodler, The Day (detail).

Friederich Nietzsche tells us that “whatever does not kill us makes us stronger.” It’s a bold statement. Yet, though today the culture often seems to reward those who wallow in self-pity (not least of all through litigation for emotional upsets and “offense”), adversity has played a crucial part in the spiritual, intellectual, and creative development […]

Is Hinduism Rational? (Part II)

“Subration is the mental process whereby one disvalues some previously appraised object or content of consciousness because of its being contradicted by a new experience. […] From the standpoint of the subject, to subrate means to undergo an experience — practical, intellectual, or spiritual — which radically changes one’s judgment about something. An object or […]

Is Hinduism Rational? (Part I)

I am well accustomed to being the only religious person in the room. My social circle is fairly diverse, but the friends that I have known the longest and with whom I have been the closest have largely been atheists (some more militant about it than others). Even with the more extreme among them, I […]

The Gods, Atomism, and Ancient Greece: A Humanist’s View

The didactic poem On the Nature of Things by the Latin poet Titus Lucretius Carus (99 – 55 BC), the longest, most detailed exposition of the ancient doctrine of Epicureanism and one of the most widely read and influential texts of the first two centuries AD, went out of circulation in the Middle Ages only […]

Richard Wagner: Revolution, and the Re-Founding of Humanity

Richard Wagner: Revolutionary.

Richard Wagner (1813 – 1883) intended his mid-Nineteenth Century innovation of Music Drama to instigate a thorough renewal, not simply of art, but rather of the human situation, as writ large, in society and culture; he foresaw in the late 1840s that his work would require a theoretical basis in metaphysics, aesthetics, and ethics.  As […]

Aleister Crowley and the Thelemic State: Frater Enatheleme in interview

In the first of People of Shambhala’s podcasts we speak to Frater Enatheleme, the man behind AC2012, about Aleister Crowley, Thelema, Freemasonry, the “Illuminati,” the esoteric, and politics — with particular focus on Thelema as a political ideology. We also discuss recent revelations that the British Government has asked internet service providers to censor “esoteric […]